Twitter, Blogging, Flickr, Instagram …

I’ve had these profiles and web domains for years.

Yet I’d never actively used them until ordering Chuck Sambuchino ‘s ‘Create Your Writer Platform’.

I recognized at the time that getting a hold of these profiles was the smart thing to do. I just wasn’t sure what purpose they would serve later on. For a while danpassaro.com was hosting my Zenfolio account for photography. I also have danielpassaro.com which simply forwards to danpassaro.com. I’ve done this with several domains.

Now that I’m moving along with the Distance In Time Series (Distance In Time: Michelle) I see how it will all come into play.

Get those usernames and domains! Inexpensive to hold on to, profitable in the future 😀

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Killing a Main Character. Do I?

No impact on the writing but certainly plenty of impact on the story.

But do I? This question has been at the forefront of my mind for the last year.

I’ve even created two outlines, one where that 2nd main character lives, the other where they die.

Keeping the 2nd main character alive presents one timeline and of course, killing that character produces another timeline.

Both are compelling stories to write.

Unlike most authors (given what I read online) I wrote my synopsis first. From there I built the story.

And so far my synopsis is fulfilled with that other main character dying.

Argghhhh! Decisions! lol 😀
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Doing what your characters do

Or doing what they’ve done, or going to do what they already did, or …

Have you done what your characters have done or will do? Will you soon be doing what they already did?

Even in the universe of fiction I found that engaging in the activity makes it far easier to write about it.

The underlying theme in my mind, as I write, is the simple standard of ‘is this plausible and if it isn’t how and where do I introduce earlier elements to make it plausible?’.

It doesn’t have to be real, just plausible. (though there is one plot device where I’m intentionally using actual results to make the point, just changing the names involved)

Is it plausible to swim with a shark? Lot’s of stories and videos abound online of doing so. But to have actually experienced it?

I did.

Twice, in one scuba dive. I talk about it HERE. That Blacktip shark was right there, not even 15 feet away.

My main character in the Distance In Time series, The Chairman, was a competition shooter in his youth. I’ve done that and keep at it every now and then.

The Chairman is a pilot. I’ve flown planes, performed landings, steep turns, aerobatics …

The character’s wife, Michelle, is a computer genius. Am I? No, but I’m familiar with code, with the concept of how it works, the meaning behind the code format. Expert? No. But enough where I can write about it.

I still have to skydive though. Yeah, the Chairman has done that also 😀

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Part 3. Surprises in writing a science fiction novel

Word Count.

As I got deeper into my concept of the Chairman and his story I noticed that the manuscript would easily go into the six digit word count.

No problem … to me. I read Tom Clancy’s Red Storm Rising in about 20 hours.

Then I got into studying the publishing business and I discovered The Rule concerning debut authors.

First book = less than 100,000 words (at least for scifi stories).

Hmmmm. Ok.

Some people might immediately see these situations as limitations.

Avoid that. Dwell instead on how this could be an opportunity.

This ‘limitation’ was exactly the thing that gave me the idea for a series.
Suddenly the story opened up much further than I’d originally envisioned.

I’m still writing the series as one continuous outline to maintain my sanity in keeping the details right though lol.

I’m going for 9x,xxx word count in each book.

Easier to work with the system than to fight it 😀

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